The Louisiana Computerized Criminal History system is also maintained by the Bureau of Criminal Identification and Information and contains arrest, disposition and incarceration information on individuals who have been arrested in the state of Louisiana. This system also contains information on individuals who have applied for certain positions which require a fingerprint based background check.
The Bulgarian Penal Code allows the removal of conviction data for individuals, known as the 'rehabilitation of individuals'. This can be awarded by a court of law given that the individual has demonstrated good conduct, and has compensated any damages. A second type of rehabilitation is known as rehabilitation de jure which enacts new legislation. This can occur if the individually has been sentenced conditionally, the individual has been sentenced to up to three years' imprisonment and has not committed any other crimes punishable by imprisonment, the individual was sentenced to a fine, public reprimand or deprivation of civil rights, and they have not committed another crime the year following. Additionally, judgments are removed from a criminal record after the sentence has been served and the following time has elapsed:
The Criminal History Records Section of the Arizona Department of Public Safety serves as the Central State Repository for criminal records in the State of Arizona (see Arizona Revised Statute §41-1750). The subject of a criminal record may review the information contained in the record for the SOLE PURPOSE OF REVIEWING THE ACCURACY AND COMPLETENESS OF THEIR RECORD.

A fingerprint background check, or Identity History Summary, is often used in conjunction with other background checks and is most often used as part of the pre-employment screening process. A fingerprint background check is mandatory for government-run institutions such as public schools, airports, law enforcement agencies, hospitals, and fire departments.
The conviction rate in the United States is nearly 99.8% with numbers varying from state to state. The high conviction rate comes from defendants pleading guilty to the charges brought against them, which results in reduced sentences. The great majority of defendants do not go to trial, and most of those who do, end up getting convicted for the crimes attributed to them.
An arrest record appears on a person’s background report when the person’s been apprehended by law enforcement on suspicion of criminal activity. It’s important to note, however, an arrest record is different from a criminal record. The former indicates only that the person was apprehended by law enforcement, but does not indicate guilt. An arrest record can show the person was held for questioning, taken into custody, held for investigation, or charged and tried.
Disclaimer: BeenVerified’s mission is to give people easy and affordable access to public record information. BeenVerified does not provide private investigator services, and is not a consumer reporting agency as defined by the Fair Credit Reporting Act because the information provided by BeenVerified is not collected or provided, in whole or in part, for the purpose of furnishing consumer reports about those search subjects. For more information governing the permitted and prohibited uses of BeenVerified, please review our “Do’s & Don’ts” and our Terms & Conditions.
State Police is designated as the CJIS Systems Agency (CSA) for Louisiana. The CSA is required to "Manage" the operations of the Law Enforcement Network and ensure Criminal Justice information access to local, parish, federal, and other criminal justice interests. This network consists of various databases and computer networks that provide essential information to the Criminal Justice community in the completion of their Criminal Justice missions.
Pre-employment screening refers to the process of investigating the backgrounds of potential employees and is commonly used to verify the accuracy of an applicant's claims as well as to discover any possible criminal history, workers compensation claims, or employer sanctions. For example, CBC News of Canada reported that fraud in the workplace cost Canadian Businesses over $3.2 Billion in 2011.[6]
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