There is a difference between background checks and criminal history reports. Background checks can include every legal action by an individual, such as getting married or divorced and filing bankruptcy. If there has been an action involving a court, then there is an activity record on file. Criminal records are usually termed as a criminal history and will list any interaction with law officials from the very beginning of an investigation. Even a police report can list specific names. However, these records are not necessarily reported instances and will not show up on a criminal history report unless an arrest was processed. Arrest records are considered criminal reports and will be included in any criminal history unless the record has been sealed from public availability by a judge. 

Since the onset of the financial crisis of 2007–2010, the level of fraud has almost doubled and some experts have predicted that it will escalate further.[9] Background-checking firm Powerchex has claimed the number of applicants lying on their applications has been increasing since the summer of 2007 when the financial crisis began.[10] In 2009, Powerchex claimed that nearly one in 5 applicants has a major lie or discrepancy on his or her application.[11]
To begin your search for information please select "Accept" below. The information provided on and obtained from this site does not constitute the official record of Kern County Superior Court. This information is provided as a service to the general public. Any user of this information is hereby advised that it is being provided "as is". The information provided may be subject to errors or omissions. Visitors to this site agree that the Court is not liable for errors or omissions or any of the information provided. Visitors further consent to access the record only as instructed by the Court and consent to the Court's monitoring of access to the records. Copyright and other proprietary rights may apply to information in a case file absent an express grant of additional rights by the holder of the copyright or other proprietary right. Use of such information is permissible only to the extent permitted by law or court order, and any use inconsistent with proprietary rights is prohibited. The Court may deny access to a member of the public for failure to comply with any of these conditions of use. Any person who willfully destroys or alters any court record maintained in electronic form is subject to the penalties imposed by Government Code section 6201. To obtain an "official certified" record of the court, please visit the Court and request the specific documents in person or do so in writing. Certification and copy fee information is available here
Eviction records are considered public record and are typically included in a credit report, making it difficult to find an apartment or home if you’ve ever been evicted. If you have been evicted, Instant Checkmate recommends building up a list of references and looking for landlords and complexes that don’t require background or credit checks. The service also recommends reaching out to the landlord who evicted you to ask if they’d be willing to remove the eviction from your credit report if you pay any remaining past-due fees and rent.  
France in particular takes into account the need for rehabilitation as well as the need for public safety. Justice Minister Dominique Perben stated "On the one hand, we must improve medical-psychiatric follow-up for these individuals and on the other hand, we must put in place a system that allows us to know where they are so we can help investigators do their jobs" in response to the soaring number of convictions for sexual offences in 2002.[45]
There is no official sex offender registry in Ireland. However, under the Sex Offenders Act 2001 which came into force in June 2001, an unofficial registry exists and is held centrally by the Gardaí. The location of sex offenders in Ireland is provided by a certificate issued by the court, stating that the convicted person is subject to the requirements of the Sex Offenders Act 2001 and is now obliged to provide certain information including their name and address to the Gardaí. Therefore, this certificate system is commonly referred to as the Sex Offenders Register, as it allows the details of all sex offenders subject to the requirements of the Sex Offenders Act 2001 to be held centrally by the Gardaí.[61]
State criminal histories are maintained by government agencies, most often by law enforcement agencies.[1] In addition to statewide records, local police departments, sheriffs' offices, and specialty police agencies may maintain their own internal databases. Records are also maintained by state departments of correction, in relation to offenders who have been sentenced to prison or a similar disposition that falls under their jurisdiction. Law enforcement agencies often share criminal history information with other enforcement agencies, and criminal history information is normally also available to the public.[2]
Checkr is one of many companies building technology to help consumers review their data. In the wake of the Facebook Cambridge Analytica scandal in March, the social media platform rolled out a step-by-step guide to help users download and delete their user data. In June, blockchain-based startup Hu-manity.co, which is working to give people access to and control of their medical records, launched a campaign to add a 31st human right to the United Nations Declaration on Human Rights: “Everyone has the right to legal ownership of their inherent human data as property.”
Go to your local police department where you reside or last resided in the United States, request that the police conduct a local or state criminal records search and provide you with a document reflecting that there is no history of a criminal record. Local police departments may require your personal appearance in order to conduct the search.  You should determine whether the country where you intend to use the records check requires that it be authenticated. For information on that process please see our authentications page.
Arrest records provided on this public website or through its interface pertain to individuals who have been charged with a crime as an adult. All named offenders are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty in a court of law. If expunged, the appropriate record(s) are removed. For information concerning the expungement process, visit: Police Records & Procedures

By closing this pop up you agree to not use our service or the information provided to make decisions about consumer credit checks, employment screening, insurance screening, tenant screening, educational screening, etc. CheckPeople does not provide consumer reports and is not a "Consumer Reporting Agency" or "CRA" as that term is defined under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, or "FCRA".
The FBI’s CJIS Division will authenticate U.S. Department of Justice Order 556-73 fingerprint search results for international requests by placing the FBI seal and signature of a Division official on the results, if requested at the time of submission. Documents prepared in this manner may then be sent to the U.S. Department of State Authentications Office by the requestor to be authenticated, if necessary. Please be sure to indicate the country in which the document is to be used. The FBI procedure became effective January 25, 2010, and applies only to documents finalized after that date. Requests to authenticate previously processed results will not be accepted.
Arrest records are official public records, completed by law enforcement agencies, when a person is placed under arrest. An arrest occurs when someone is seized and taken into custody. Local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies all maintain arrest records, and the agency responsible for reporting the arrest is the agency that actually made the arrest. The responsible agency will be determined by a number of factors including jurisdiction and the crime charged. While law enforcement agencies are responsible for reporting, arrest records may also be available from state and federal courts. Federal agencies with the power to arrest include: FBI, ATF, and DEA agencies, as well as any other federal agency given police power from the DHS to the DOE. Most states have at least one state-level law enforcement agency, and many have multiple law enforcement agencies. These agencies usually include some type of highway patrol and game wardens in addition to other state-specific agencies. Local police may include county or municipal law enforcement agencies, and are responsible for the vast majority of arrests.

An individual requiring an apostille or authenticated copy of his/her FBI Identification Record, or any non-U.S. national or permanent resident who wishes to request his/her FBI Identification Record must submit a request directly to the FBI CJIS Division. The U.S. Department of State Authentications Office may then place an apostille document for use in a country that is party to the Hague Apostille Convention. For countries not party to the Hague Apostille Convention, the U.S. Department of State Authentication Office will place a certification over the FBI seal.
When police take a person into custody, he or she is under arrest. The arrest can happen following an investigation or immediately after a crime is committed. Law enforcement agencies across the United States keep detailed arrest records that contain the criminal history of individuals who committed crimes. A document that details a person's history is called an Arrest Record, or a Criminal Record.
In New Zealand, criminal records are administered by the Ministry of Justice. Under the Criminal Records (Clean Slate) Act 2004, records are automatically hidden from the public for less serious offences, if the individual has had no convictions for at least seven years and meets the other criteria of the act. An individual can request either their current (Clean Slate) or complete criminal record through the Ministry of Justice, or provide authorisation for a third party (e.g. employer) to view the current record. It is illegal, with some exceptions, for a third party to request a complete criminal record.[82]

In Cyprus, criminal records are held by the Criminal Investigation Office of Cyprus Police[29] which forms part of the Republic of Cyprus Minister of Justice and Public Order. A Clear Criminal Record Certificate or existing Criminal Record can be requested by individuals through application to the Criminal Investigation Office. Applications can be made in person at the Central Police Station in Nicosia. Criminal records in Cyprus are maintained for life.
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