State criminal histories are maintained by government agencies, most often by law enforcement agencies.[1] In addition to statewide records, local police departments, sheriffs' offices, and specialty police agencies may maintain their own internal databases. Records are also maintained by state departments of correction, in relation to offenders who have been sentenced to prison or a similar disposition that falls under their jurisdiction. Law enforcement agencies often share criminal history information with other enforcement agencies, and criminal history information is normally also available to the public.[2]

There is a centralised criminal record system, there is only one centralised database where the final criminal conviction issued by a Slovak criminal court is registered. This database is in electronic form and is maintained a unit within the General Prosecutors office of the Slovak Republic. The relevant legislation for this is governed by the Act on Criminal Records.[87] As of 2008 there was a proposed bill that these criminal records could only be accessed by request to the General Prosecutors office when the person in question was up for a position which required a clean criminal record. Certain criminal records are not accessible at any time for instance the criminal record/record details of the President of the Republic of Slovakia are not available to anyone during his/her time in office.[88] The criminal records and persona details of everyone held by the General Prosecutors office are lifelong, and continue to be updated throughout their life, every time they move address/change name etc.
Requirements for expungement vary by state. For example, Utah’s expungement laws require you to pay all fines, fees, restitutions and interest related to the crime, but there is a long list of offenses that cannot be expunged, such as violent felonies, first degree felonies and sex offenses. The state also has a complicated list of other reasons for denying expungement, most of which involve felony and misdemeanor convictions showing a pattern of criminal activity. 
In Broken Records, a report on the problems with background checks, the National Consumer Law Center reported that Samuel M. Jackson was allegedly denied employment based on a felony conviction. However, according to the background check, the felony occurred when Jackson was just four years old. In truth, the report misattributed the crime because his name was similar to the actual felon's. Such inaccuracies, according the report, are widespread with background check services because of an “industry-wide lack of accountability” and incentive to “cut corners” in how they collect and attribute information.   
Although this database is not public, applications for a criminal records disclosure can be made to the DCREM, anyone who has lived in Slovenia for a significant amount of time may apply for the disclosure of a particular criminal record. Although perspective employers cannot request a copy directly from the DCREM, they must request this from the perspective employee.[89] The time in which a conviction remains on a person's criminal record depends on the type of conviction received, i.e. The longer the prison sentence served the longer the conviction remains on the record, up to 15 years. If a conviction is 15 years' imprisonment this shall never be removed from the criminal record. However, if the conviction is removed, then all rights are given back to the person in question, as if the conviction had never been received at all.
However, Nick Clements argues in "Should Identity Theft Really Scare You?" that you shouldn’t necessarily lose sleep about it. While identity theft is on the rise, the vast majority of the cases are reported as account takeovers – instances where someone uses your financial information to make purchases or gains entry into and takes over an account. These are, according to Clements, nothing to worry about. Since this kind of identity theft is common enough, banks and financial institutions are very good at making things right, so long as you report the fraud as soon as possible. In fact, 96 percent of people who experienced identity theft never had to pay a dime.
Background checks can cost between $40 and $50 each. Before you spend that much money, you’ll want to know if a service provides correct information. To gauge accuracy, we purchased reports for three people. We chose to look at multiple reports because much of the information comes from public records, and it can vary depending on the state your subject lives in.
In the 21st century, there has been controversy about for-profit data mining companies that harvest much of the electronic booking blotter records from various police authorities[104] nationwide and offer it free on the public Internet and for sale to employers. Though frequently effective at identifying applicants with criminal backgrounds, the mined data does not usually reflect subsequent results of any criminal prosecution, acquittal, or dismissal of charges,[105] and the highly prejudicial nature of such records can damage applicant chances for jobs and other benefits when such records are not in proper context of subsequent prosecutorial result for a hiring manager or recruiter to evaluate. In many cases, records are available for seven years[106] or more beyond acquittals or dismissal of charges. In addition, since arrest records can sometimes be mistakenly matched to individuals with the same or similar names, the prejudicial nature of the available records, particularly violent ones, can negatively affect applicants and candidates in a dramatic way when they otherwise have no actual criminal record.[107]
A chapter 11 bankruptcy is filed when the individual or business wants to reorganize debt. This is most common with businesses, as it allows them to repay debts (under the supervision of a court) in such a way to allow the business to continue operating. It requires the business to develop a profitability plan, show cost cutting measures and show how they are increasing revenue. If an individual files a chapter 11, they are most likely an owner of a small business.
Disclaimer: BeenVerified’s mission is to give people easy and affordable access to public record information, but BeenVerified does not provide private investigator services or consumer reports, and is not a consumer reporting agency per the Fair Credit Reporting Act. You may not use our site or service or the information provided to make decisions about employment, admission, consumer credit, insurance, tenant screening or any other purpose that would require FCRA compliance. For more information governing permitted and prohibited uses, please review our “Do’s & Don’ts” and Terms & Conditions.
The National Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (NLETS) is an interface to search each state's criminal and driver records as well as the License Plate Reader (LPR) records going back one year maintained by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Thus through NLETS, a law enforcement agency in one state could search for someone's criminal and driver records in another state. NLETS potentially serves as a better tool to search for minor misdemeanors and traffic violations that would not be in the NCIC.
Information contained herein includes current and prior offenses. The Sarasota County Sheriff's Office updates this information regularly, to ensure that it is complete and accurate, however this information can change quickly. The information on this site may not reflect the true current location, status, release date or other information regarding a detainee. Technical difficulties may cause updates to be delayed; therefore the Sarasota County Sheriff's Office makes no guarantee as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained herein.

While not officially a criminal history repository, the National Driver Register (NDR), operated by the Department of Transportation, maintains information on drivers regarding suspended licenses. The NDR maintains a database of information posted by individual states as mandated by federal law. All drivers who have had their licenses suspended for any reason (including suspensions resulting from several successive minor traffic violations: Massachusetts suspends for three separate speeding tickets over a six-month period) have that information posted by state Registry of Motor Vehicles offices to the NDR.
Portland Public Schools recognizes the diversity and worth of all individuals and groups and their roles in society. It is the policy of the Portland Public Schools Board of Education that there will be no discrimination or harassment of individuals or groups on the grounds of age, color, creed, disability, marital status, national origin, race, religion, sex or sexual orientation in any educational programs, activities or employment.
DISCLAIMER: You may not use our service or the information it provides to make decisions about consumer credit, employment, insurance, tenant screening, or any other purpose that would require Fair Credit and Reporting Act (FCRA) compliance. GoLookUp does not provide consumer reports and is not a consumer reporting agency. (These terms have special meanings under the Fair Credit Reporting Act, 15 USC 1681 et seq., ("FCRA"), which are incorporated herein by reference.) The information available on our website may not be 100% accurate, complete, or up to date, so do not use it as a substitute for your own due diligence, especially if you have concerns about a person's criminal history. GoLookUp does not make any representation or warranty about the accuracy of the information available through our website or about the character or integrity of the person about whom you inquire. For more information, please review GoLookup Terms of Use.

The Criminal Records Department of the Clerk of Court's office, located in room 2501 of the 19th Judicial District Courthouse at 300 North Boulevard, assists the Criminal Judges in the preparation and processing of criminal cases. The District Attorney's Office and various law enforcement agencies work closely with the Criminal Records Department. These agencies initiate the proceedings that culminate in the prosecution of an individual.


All states have official "statewide repositories" of criminal history information that include information contributed by the various county and municipal courts and law enforcement agencies within the state.[101] State repositories are usually accurate, but all states have provisions for the correction of errors that occur in the reporting and recording of criminal history information. Individuals may normally obtain their own records from the state, but to obtain the records of another person, a private individual will normally need to obtain a release from the subject of the record search.[102]
Formally, an arrest only refers to those times when an individual is seized and taken into custody. However, depending on each individual law enforcement agency’s own reporting requirements, their arrest records may contain additional information. In addition to a report of actual arrests, you may find information in an arrest record relating to a person being questioned, detained, investigated, charged with a crime, indicted, or facing trial.
Disclaimer: BeenVerified’s mission is to give people easy and affordable access to public record information. BeenVerified does not provide private investigator services, and is not a consumer reporting agency as defined by the Fair Credit Reporting Act because the information provided by BeenVerified is not collected or provided, in whole or in part, for the purpose of furnishing consumer reports about those search subjects. For more information governing the permitted and prohibited uses of BeenVerified, please review our “Do’s & Don’ts” and our Terms & Conditions.
There has been a growing movement on the web to use advertising-based models to subsidize these checks. These companies display targeted ads next to the reports delivered to landlords or employers. Some of the reports provided by these pay sites are only expanded versions of a basic people search providing a 20-year history of addresses, phone numbers, marriages and divorces, businesses owned and property ownership. Usually, these sites will also provide a nationwide criminal report for an added charge.

Individuals and the self-employed cannot apply for a DBS check of their own criminal record, as they cannot ask an exempted question (a valid request for a person to reveal their full criminal history, including spent convictions) of themselves. Only organisations registered with the DBS can ask an exempted question and submit applications for criminal records checks. There are two types of registered organisation: a registered body, which is the employer; and an umbrella body, a registered body that processes criminal record checks for non-registered organisations who can ask the exempted question.
Disclaimer: BeenVerified’s mission is to give people easy and affordable access to public record information. BeenVerified does not provide private investigator services, and is not a consumer reporting agency as defined by the Fair Credit Reporting Act because the information provided by BeenVerified is not collected or provided, in whole or in part, for the purpose of furnishing consumer reports about those search subjects. For more information governing the permitted and prohibited uses of BeenVerified, please review our “Do’s & Don’ts” and our Terms & Conditions.
Criminal histories are maintained by law enforcement agencies in all levels of government. Local police departments, sheriffs' offices, and specialty police agencies may maintain their own internal databases. On the state level, state police, troopers, highway patrol, correctional agencies, and other law enforcement agencies also maintain separate databases. Law enforcement agencies often share this information with other similar enforcement agencies and this information is usually made available to the public.[100]
The first Polish research on the issue of pre-employment screening shows that 81% of recruiters have come across the phenomenon of lies in the CVs of candidates for the job.[citation needed] The survey was conducted by IBBC Group and Background Screening Service, which deal with outsourcing and conducting background screenings in Central - Eastern Europe.
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