Arrest records can contain a significant amount of information. First, they will indicate why someone was arrested and when the arrest occurred. When searching for arrest records, most people are looking for evidence of violent crime, theft or fraud, and drug or alcohol violations. However, arrest records may reflect a number of different crimes, and, depending on jurisdiction, may even reflect business related or traffic offenses.
We try to be unbiased about these things. Every provider has its strengths and weaknesses, depending on how they collect their data and what kind of algorithms they use. If you click on Public Records above in the navigation, we’ve done extensive reviews on all of the big background check providers and you can then decide which one you want to try.
Arrests, prosecutions and the disposition of the case for persons arrested for Class B misdemeanor or greater violation of Texas criminal statutes, as well as Class C convictions or deferred adjudications that are reported to the Department. The statute identifies many of the actual data elements. In addition, although not required by statute, CCH has traditionally included limited supervision data reported to DPS by TDCJ.
Arrests for felonies, misdemeanors, and both criminal and civil charges are included in the Arrest Record. They may also contain pending warrants, fines, or monetary restitution for an arrest or conviction, and charges that have been dismissed or for which the individual was acquitted. If an arrest led to a conviction, the Arrest Record may list the sentence and any incarceration. An Arrest Record will also show if an individual is on the sex offender registry.
There are a variety of types of investigative searches that can be used by potential employers. Many commercial sites will offer specific searches to employers for a fee. Services like these will actually perform the checks, supply the company with adverse action letters, and ensure compliance throughout the process. It is important to be selective about which pre-employment screening agency one uses. A legitimate company will be happy to explain the process. Many employers choose to search the most common records such as criminal records, driving records, and education verification. Other searches such as sex offender registry, credential verification, skills assessment, reference checks, credit reports and Patriot Act searches are becoming increasingly common. Employers should consider the position in question when determining which types of searches to include, and should always use the same searches for every applicant being considered for one.
Private prisons are prisons that are owned and operated by private companies in the United States. Prison privatization began because governments across the United States needed additional prison capacity they did not have. To choose the company that will run a certain prison, bids are held and the company with the most desirable bid wins. The company that gets chosen is in charge of taking over the daily operations of the prison, such as providing prisoners with supplies, hiring staff, providing prisoners with mandated programs, etc. As of 2018, private prisons in the United States house over 120,000 inmates – about 8% of the total prison population in the country.
Find out exactly where the sex offenders in your neighborhood live with a Criminal Records search. You can get detailed information about the sex offenders, when available, including their image, address, and specifics about their sexual offenses. If the person you searched has a record of sexual offenses in the past, a Criminal Records search could give you critical information about the person in question.
Believe it or not, almost all of this information is public record by law, and is available to anyone who is willing to make the effort to search for it. Some jurisdictions make it incredibly simple, and have dedicated web portals that allow you to search. Others are stuck in the paper age, and often require an on site search in the county courthouse. This can be done by using a “court runner”, as well.
Criminal record check can be conducted in a number of different ways. It can be done on-site at the respective public offices or stations, by mail (conventional or electronic), or online through the internet. Each has its strengths and weaknesses. On-site offers the most detailed and up-to-date information but is time-consuming and requires physical presence. Mail takes forever, albeit much improved with its electronic and live version. In all practicality, the best option is online.
State criminal histories are maintained by government agencies, most often by law enforcement agencies.[1] In addition to statewide records, local police departments, sheriffs' offices, and specialty police agencies may maintain their own internal databases. Records are also maintained by state departments of correction, in relation to offenders who have been sentenced to prison or a similar disposition that falls under their jurisdiction. Law enforcement agencies often share criminal history information with other enforcement agencies, and criminal history information is normally also available to the public.[2]
In Germany, a criminal record certificate (Führungszeugnis) is issued by the Federal Office of Justice (Germany) [de] (Bundesamt für Justiz). Germany has a criminal record system holding all the information regarding past offences and sentences. The information is maintained by the Federal Central Criminal Register (Bundeszentralregister), which is in turn subordinate to the Federal Ministry of Justice.[47] The registry is updated daily and holds information on approximately 6.3 million individuals.
Candidates who are applying for jobs that require financial responsibility are often screened based on their credit scores and financial histories. Additionally, public records and professional listings compiled during background checks can help employers confirm a candidate’s work history and qualifications, making it easier to spot false information on a CV.

In the United States, criminal records may be expunged, though laws vary by state. Many types of offenses may be expunged, ranging from parking fines to felonies. In general, once sealed or expunged, all records of an arrest and/or subsequent court case are removed from the public record, and the individual may legally deny or fail to acknowledge ever having been arrested for or charged with any crime which has been expunged.
In Lithuania, judgments will be removed from the Register immediately after the completion of the sentence, depending on the seriousness of the sentence. For high-risk recidivists (10 years from completion of sentence), very serious offences (8 years), serious offences (5 years), less serious offences (3 years), suspended sentences (immediately on completion of sentence). In cases of minors, convictions incurring custodial sentences remain unspent for half the period of time stated above.[43]
The information on this site reflects the circumstances of an arrest and the information available at that time. It has no connection to the findings of guilt or innocence or the acquittal or dismissal of a criminal charge. It does not reflect the final disposition of any criminal charges. For information about the final disposition of arrests go to www.leeclerk.org.
The prisoners sentenced to incarceration are divided into two major facilities in accordance to their crime. Those who violate United States federal law are placed in federal prisons, whereas those who violate territorial laws and/or state laws are placed in territorial or state prisons allowing authorities to monitor and analyze criminal acts in their jurisdiction.

Checks are frequently conducted to confirm information found on an employment application or résumé/curriculum vitae. One study showed that half of all reference checks done on prospective employees differed between what the job applicant provided and what the source reported.[3] They may also be conducted as a way to further differentiate potential employees and pick the one the employer feels is best suited for the position. Employers have an obligation to make sure their work environment is safe for all employees and helps prevent other employment problems in the workplace.[4]
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