There are a variety of types of investigative searches that can be used by potential employers. Many commercial sites will offer specific searches to employers for a fee. Services like these will actually perform the checks, supply the company with adverse action letters, and ensure compliance throughout the process. It is important to be selective about which pre-employment screening agency one uses. A legitimate company will be happy to explain the process. Many employers choose to search the most common records such as criminal records, driving records, and education verification. Other searches such as sex offender registry, credential verification, skills assessment, reference checks, credit reports and Patriot Act searches are becoming increasingly common. Employers should consider the position in question when determining which types of searches to include, and should always use the same searches for every applicant being considered for one.
A background check is a process a person or company uses to verify that a person is who they claim to be, and provides an opportunity for someone to check a person’s criminal record, education, employment history, and other activities that happened in the past in order to confirm their validity. Whether you’re applying for a job, looking for a new apartment, or purchasing a firearm, you may have to undergo a background check.
Due to the sensitivity of the information contained in consumer reports and certain records, there are a variety of important laws regulating the dissemination and legal use of this information. Most notably, the Fair Credit Reporting Act (FCRA) regulates the use of consumer reports (which it defines as information collected and reported by third party agencies) as it pertains to adverse decisions, notification to the applicant, and destruction and safekeeping of records.
To learn about a person’s criminal history, you can request a criminal record check be performed. Massachusetts has 2 types of criminal records. Name-based court arraignment records, also known as CORI, are created and maintained by the Massachusetts courts. Fingerprint-supported arrest records, which are created by police departments at the time of arrest, can contain information about both state and national arrests.
Employers may investigate past employment to verify position and salary information. More intensive checks can involve interviews with anybody that knew or previously knew the applicant—such as teachers, friends, coworkers, neighbors, and family members; however, extensive hearsay investigations in background checks can expose companies to lawsuits. Past employment and personal reference verifications are moving toward standardization with most companies in order to avoid expensive litigation.

Criminal histories are maintained by law enforcement agencies in all levels of government. Local police departments, sheriffs' offices, and specialty police agencies may maintain their own internal databases. On the state level, state police, troopers, highway patrol, correctional agencies, and other law enforcement agencies also maintain separate databases. Law enforcement agencies often share this information with other similar enforcement agencies and this information is usually made available to the public.[100]
In the United States, any person, including a private investigator, criminal research or background check company, may go to a county courthouse and search an index of criminal records by name and date of birth or have a county clerk search for records on an individual. Such a search may produce information about criminal and non-criminal charges that do not otherwise appear on a state criminal history abstract.

Google Yourself: Searching for yourself is not as narcissistic as you might assume. You can only figure out what needs improving by seeing what is easily accessible about you. Think of it this way – by Googling your name, you’re only doing what potential employers are going to do anyway. It allows you to evaluate what is good for them to see and what you can better manage. Ericksen even recommends setting up Google Alerts so you can track every time you are mentioned on the internet.  
When police take a person into custody, he or she is under arrest. The arrest can happen following an investigation or immediately after a crime is committed. Law enforcement agencies across the United States keep detailed arrest records that contain the criminal history of individuals who committed crimes. A document that details a person's history is called an Arrest Record, or a Criminal Record.

There has been a growing movement on the web to use advertising-based models to subsidize these checks. These companies display targeted ads next to the reports delivered to landlords or employers. Some of the reports provided by these pay sites are only expanded versions of a basic people search providing a 20-year history of addresses, phone numbers, marriages and divorces, businesses owned and property ownership. Usually, these sites will also provide a nationwide criminal report for an added charge.


Eviction records are considered public record and are typically included in a credit report, making it difficult to find an apartment or home if you’ve ever been evicted. If you have been evicted, Instant Checkmate recommends building up a list of references and looking for landlords and complexes that don’t require background or credit checks. The service also recommends reaching out to the landlord who evicted you to ask if they’d be willing to remove the eviction from your credit report if you pay any remaining past-due fees and rent.  
The prisoners sentenced to incarceration are divided into two major facilities in accordance to their crime. Those who violate United States federal law are placed in federal prisons, whereas those who violate territorial laws and/or state laws are placed in territorial or state prisons allowing authorities to monitor and analyze criminal acts in their jurisdiction.
An individual requiring an apostille or authenticated copy of his/her FBI Identification Record, or any non-U.S. national or permanent resident who wishes to request his/her FBI Identification Record must submit a request directly to the FBI CJIS Division. The U.S. Department of State Authentications Office may then place an apostille document for use in a country that is party to the Hague Apostille Convention. For countries not party to the Hague Apostille Convention, the U.S. Department of State Authentication Office will place a certification over the FBI seal.
Print out the Application to Obtain copy of State Summary Criminal History Record (Form BCIA 8705, pdf) and follow the instructions on the form. A Spanish version of this form is also available (Form BCIA 8705S, pdf). Please contact your local law enforcement agency for fingerprinting services. PLEASE NOTE: Your fingerprint card must contain your full name, date of birth, sex and return mailing address. If you are having difficulty in obtaining a blank fingerprint card, please contact the Record Review Unit at (916) 227-3849.

The identity theft you should worry about is identity takeover. This is when someone uses your personal information to open new accounts, credit cards and loans. However, this kind of identity theft is rare, occurring to only 4 percent of the people who experience identity theft. So even with all the data breaches occurring each year, the chances your information will be purchased on the dark web is almost on par with winning the lottery. Albeit a terrible kind of lottery.


The Louisiana State Police, NCIC/LLETS Access Unit, pursuant to Federal Regulations, provides oversight to the informational exchange between the Louisiana Criminal Justice system users and their counterparts throughout the world. The Louisiana Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (LLETS) is managed by the Department of Public Safety and Corrections (DPS&C), Louisiana State Police, and allows various authorized Criminal Justice entities to access and exchange critical Criminal Justice information. The Department also oversees access to the National Crime Information Center (NCIC), the Interstate Identification Index (III), and the International Justice and Public Safety Network (NLETS). These various systems are loosely defined as the "Law Enforcement Network."

Private nuisance lawsuits are between two private citizens, where one believes the other is interfering with the enjoyment of property or quality of life. For example, if your neighbor doesn’t take care of his yard and the weeds and bushes are a nuisance, you can file a private nuisance lawsuit to get a court judgement requiring him to take care of his yard.  
Under Article 86, criminal record data may be given only to courts and state attorney's offices when a criminal case is brought against the person. Governmental bodies can access this data upon a reasonable request and must be related to specific tasks in public service to be entrusted to the person for whom such information is requested. The police can also gain access with the intention of discovering the perpetrator of a criminal act. Other members of the general public do not have the right to demand that citizens submit records concerning their convictions. A citizen retains the right to access data from their own criminal record, only under the condition that the purpose is to exercise his rights in another state.[27]

Arrest records are official public records, completed by law enforcement agencies, when a person is placed under arrest. An arrest occurs when someone is seized and taken into custody. Local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies all maintain arrest records, and the agency responsible for reporting the arrest is the agency that actually made the arrest. The responsible agency will be determined by a number of factors including jurisdiction and the crime charged. While law enforcement agencies are responsible for reporting, arrest records may also be available from state and federal courts. Federal agencies with the power to arrest include: FBI, ATF, and DEA agencies, as well as any other federal agency given police power from the DHS to the DOE. Most states have at least one state-level law enforcement agency, and many have multiple law enforcement agencies. These agencies usually include some type of highway patrol and game wardens in addition to other state-specific agencies. Local police may include county or municipal law enforcement agencies, and are responsible for the vast majority of arrests.
With online, criminal record search can be conducted at any hour, 24/7, and anywhere as long as internet access is available. These are important factors because such checks often require immediacy. It can get touchy too. If we’re just acting on a hunch about someone, it goes without saying that we should not be too public about it. Fortunately, online search allows us to search from the privacy of our home or office, greatly reducing the probability of being caught in the act.

Checkr’s view is that, in many cases, minor offenses unrelated to the work in question shouldn’t limit people’s prosperity (e.g. someone with a traffic violation applying to work in a call center). In other words, people deserve second chances. As co-founder and CEO Daniel Yanisse told Entrepreneur in an interview earlier this year, unemployed individuals with criminal records cost the U.S. economy roughy $87 billion a year and are more likely to commit another crime. On the other hand, people with criminal records stay in jobs longer.

However, according to Criminal Watch Dog, you can get a felony removed from a background check, but only if you apply for the record to be expunged. Even a pardoned crime isn’t removed from your criminal record, despite what people often think. Rather, a pardoned crime is just noted as having been forgiven by a person in executive power, like the Governor or President.

This day and age, you can’t be too safe. Use a PeopleFinders criminal records lookup to look into the possible criminal histories of people around you, such as coworkers, friends, or neighbors. See if a Craigslist seller has a criminal past. Check yourself out to see what comes up. Even learn about your online dating matches and significant others!

Those seeking employment in the government relating in a field of national security, law enforcement, or other field of safety or security may look into a persons background not disclosed in applications. Those who fail a polygraph test may not be selected. In the United States laws regarding the use are under the Employee Polygraph Protection Act.
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