A criminal record will be created after sentencing because of a violation or crime. The record will exist for 5 years in case of violations or 20 years for crimes. If the sentence is three years of imprisonment or longer, 30 years will be added at the time the criminal record will be stored. A traffic violation (according to the Mulder law) will not be stored in a criminal record, unless there will be a trial. Normally the traffic fine is given by a police officer, and the payment is generally done by banking. There won't be a trial, nor an addition in a criminal record. In case of sexual crimes (article 240b-250) the criminal record will be destroyed after 80 years. (article 4)

The NCIC (National Crime Information Center) is a repository of criminal history information that has been reported to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The NCIC stores information regarding open arrest warrants, arrests, stolen property, missing persons, and dispositions regarding felonies and misdemeanors. With a very few exceptions, the records compiled by the federal government within the NCIC are not made available to the private sector.
The FBI's compilation of an individual's criminal identification, arrest, conviction, and incarceration information is known as the Interstate Identification Index, or "Triple-I" for short. This is basically the FBI's rap sheet (Record of Arrest and Prosecution). It contains information voluntarily reported by law enforcement agencies across the country, as well as information provided by other federal agencies. It contains information on felonies and misdemeanors, and may also contain municipal and traffic offenses if reported by the individual agencies.
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The Bureau of Criminal Identification and Information manages and oversees the Automated Fingerprint Identification System. AFIS is a statewide, automated fingerprint identification system, which is integrated with mugshot and computerized criminal history (CCH) information. The goal of this system is to provide real time identification of individuals at the time of booking, resulting in timely updates to the state's CCH, mugshot and fingerprint databases. All of this is accomplished in a paperless environment. The Bureau of Criminal Identification and Information provides operational management and technical assistance to the users of the system in addition to ensuring system operational compliance and quality control.
Background check reports from the services we reviewed aren’t always up-to-date or accurate. They can be good for confirming that the guy in an online dating profile is a real person and that your son’s soccer coach isn’t a felon, but because these services use web-scraping software to scour the internet for public information, the reports are not always accurate. This is especially true for finding info on people with common names or contextualizing a person’s associative relationships, for example.

With our web-based criminal records searches, you'll get instant access to almost any adult's criminal past. We have detailed data for over 250 million U.S. adults. Plus, we've made it easy to get started with your criminal records search. All you have to do is fill out the person’s name, city and state fields near the top of the page, and hit the "Search" button to begin your lookup. Easy as that.

In Canada, criminal records are stored in Criminal Records Information Management Services,[10] a centralized database operated by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police under the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) since 1972.[11] The database includes all convictions for which a pardon has not been granted, all charges regardless of disposition, outstanding warrants and charges, all judicial orders and other information that might be of interest to police investigations.[12]


In Lithuania, judgments will be removed from the Register immediately after the completion of the sentence, depending on the seriousness of the sentence. For high-risk recidivists (10 years from completion of sentence), very serious offences (8 years), serious offences (5 years), less serious offences (3 years), suspended sentences (immediately on completion of sentence). In cases of minors, convictions incurring custodial sentences remain unspent for half the period of time stated above.[43]
Information contained herein includes current and prior offenses. The Sarasota County Sheriff's Office updates this information regularly, to ensure that it is complete and accurate, however this information can change quickly. The information on this site may not reflect the true current location, status, release date or other information regarding a detainee. Technical difficulties may cause updates to be delayed; therefore the Sarasota County Sheriff's Office makes no guarantee as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained herein.
Criminal histories are maintained by law enforcement agencies in all levels of government. Local police departments, sheriffs' offices, and specialty police agencies may maintain their own internal databases. On the state level, state police, troopers, highway patrol, correctional agencies, and other law enforcement agencies also maintain separate databases. Law enforcement agencies often share this information with other similar enforcement agencies and this information is usually made available to the public.[100]

The NCIC (National Crime Information Center) is a repository of criminal history information that has been reported to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). The NCIC stores information regarding open arrest warrants, arrests, stolen property, missing persons, and dispositions regarding felonies and misdemeanors. With a very few exceptions, the records compiled by the federal government within the NCIC are not made available to the private sector.

Portugal's criminal record system is an electronic database manned and maintained by Portugal's Direcção Geral da Administração da Justiça (General Direction for the Administration of Justice, DGAJ).[73] The system contains the records of Portuguese citizens that reside in Portugal, Portuguese nationals that live abroad and any foreign citizens that reside within Portugal.[73] Disclosure of an individual's criminal record is allowed at the request of the individual; themselves, or a third party with written consent of the individual. For example, an employer may request to see their possible employee's criminal record with their consent. However, the application must be made in person.[73] The certificate regarding criminal records in Portugal is called a "certificado do registo criminal" (certificate of criminal registration) which conveys whether an individual has a criminal record. An extension of this is a more detailed certificate regarding an individual's criminal activities which provides evidence for an individual to be employed in a job where they have access to large sums of cash, need high security clearance or supervise children.[73] This particular certificate is granted in a similar way to Australia's Working With Children Check, which supplies an employer with information regarding any previous criminal activity and ensures that convicted criminals are not employed in the same areas where they may have previously committed crimes.[73][85] Applications for the certificates can be made through several channels, there is a central repository for criminal records located in Lisbon, alongside a vast selection of regional courts and their administration services throughout Portugal that can provide individuals with certificates and for Portuguese nationals residing overseas, applications can be made through embassies and consulates.[73] However, none of the channels through which the certificates are available provide translation services, and therefore the certificate produced is always written in Portuguese, even when produced by an embassy in a non-Portuguese-speaking state.[73]
In the United Kingdom, checks on a person's criminal record are undertaken by the Disclosure and Barring Service (in England and Wales), Disclosure Scotland (Scotland and basic Disclosure for all the UK) and Access Northern Ireland, all of which have partial access to the Police National Computer (PNC) which holds the definitive record. The ACPO criminal records office was founded in 2006, and it has the role of managing criminal record information and improving links between criminal records and biometric information.[97] These records are not publicly accessible and cannot be viewed without the subject's consent, although in some cases an employer might make such consent a condition of employment, especially if the employee is to work with children or other vulnerable people. The child sex offenders disclosure scheme allows parents and guardians to ask the police if someone with access to a child has a record for child sexual offences.[98]

The length of time convictions are kept on the record varies according to type of conviction. Convictions will be removed from a criminal record after 5 years (suspended sentences, fines, and community service supplementary to a suspended sentence), 10 years (custodial sentences less than 2 years, community service) or 20 years (custodial sentences between 2–5 years). If no recent convictions have been added to an individual's records, judgments will be removed upon death or when the individual reaches 90 years old.[35]
The answer to this question depends on which state actually filed the charges. Some states automatically delete and destroy any arrest records on individuals who were not convicted of a charge following an arrest. Sometimes individuals are detained but never officially arrested, usually due to the fact that the officer could not find probable cause after an investigation. In most instances, individuals are not detained unless an officer thinks they can find probable cause through a warrant or if they believe the individual has crucial information regarding a crime. Even persons who have knowledge of a crime can be suspected of involvement as an accomplice. Law enforcement officials regularly use this option to file charges and arrest the suspected informant, even when the chance they would be acquitted is high. And, sometimes this involvement will at least generate an arrest record.
A chapter 7 bankruptcy is the most common among individuals, though businesses can file it as well. People file for this when their debt is unmanageable. It requires the court to make an evaluation of the debtor’s possessions and assets. The process starts by liquidating non-exempt property to repay as much of the debts as possible: second homes, secondary vehicles, stocks, bonds, available cash, valuable heirlooms and any other high-value possessions. If there is still unpaid debt, the person’s exempt property is liquidated to repay debt: household items, clothing, tools of a trade, personal vehicles.
State Police is designated as the CJIS Systems Agency (CSA) for Louisiana. The CSA is required to "Manage" the operations of the Law Enforcement Network and ensure Criminal Justice information access to local, parish, federal, and other criminal justice interests. This network consists of various databases and computer networks that provide essential information to the Criminal Justice community in the completion of their Criminal Justice missions.
These checks are often used by employers as a means of judging a job candidate's past mistakes, character, and fitness, and to identify potential hiring risks for safety and security reasons. Background checks are also used to thoroughly investigate potential government employees in order to be given a security clearance. However, these checks may sometimes be used for illegal purposes, such as unlawful discrimination (or employment discrimination), identity theft, and violation of privacy.
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