Google Yourself: Searching for yourself is not as narcissistic as you might assume. You can only figure out what needs improving by seeing what is easily accessible about you. Think of it this way – by Googling your name, you’re only doing what potential employers are going to do anyway. It allows you to evaluate what is good for them to see and what you can better manage. Ericksen even recommends setting up Google Alerts so you can track every time you are mentioned on the internet.  
Type your name and city into a search engine to see what comes up (make sure to turn off all personalization settings in your browser first). Beyond that, check all the privacy settings on your social media accounts (If you aren't sure how to do this, there are plenty of helpful guides online). Make sure your photos and posts are shared only with the people you're comfortable sharing them with. If you have any posts or photos that could be seen as unprofessional, make sure they are kept private or deleted.
Arrest records can contain a significant amount of information. First, they will indicate why someone was arrested and when the arrest occurred. When searching for arrest records, most people are looking for evidence of violent crime, theft or fraud, and drug or alcohol violations. However, arrest records may reflect a number of different crimes, and, depending on jurisdiction, may even reflect business related or traffic offenses.

The National Law Enforcement Telecommunications System (NLETS) is an interface to search each state's criminal and driver records as well as the License Plate Reader (LPR) records going back one year maintained by the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP). Thus through NLETS, a law enforcement agency in one state could search for someone's criminal and driver records in another state. NLETS potentially serves as a better tool to search for minor misdemeanors and traffic violations that would not be in the NCIC.
Criminal histories are maintained by law enforcement agencies in all levels of government. Local police departments, sheriffs' offices, and specialty police agencies may maintain their own internal databases. On the state level, state police, troopers, highway patrol, correctional agencies, and other law enforcement agencies also maintain separate databases. Law enforcement agencies often share this information with other similar enforcement agencies and this information is usually made available to the public.[100]
The Swedish Criminal Records Registry is administered by the Swedish National Police Board which regulates access to criminal records and the use of criminal background checks by employers.[94] The registry contains information on those who have been sentenced in criminal courts or summarily imposed a fine, who have had a restraining order issued against them, or in whose cases prosecution had been abstained from. Generally, the information is kept for five years if the offence was punishable by fine, and ten years if it called for other sentences and sanctions. For those aged under 18 at the time the crime was committed, information is kept for only three or five years depending on the type of punishment.[93]
We’re driven by speed, efficiency and quality and backed by one of the most experienced teams in the industry. You too can depend on HireRight as your background check company to provide your organization with an intelligent approach to screening — one that is grounded in years of trusted experience in helping clients make sound, fast decisions with confidence.
×