Job seekers can also benefit from running self-background checks. Even candidates with no criminal history or financial problems should run a background check to verify the public information tied to his or her name. Identity theft, inaccurate or missing information, and outdated traffic violations can all create red flags for employers. By conducting a self-background check, job seekers can assure they are being accurately represented and can meet potential problems head-on.
The conviction rate in the United States is nearly 99.8% with numbers varying from state to state. The high conviction rate comes from defendants pleading guilty to the charges brought against them, which results in reduced sentences. The great majority of defendants do not go to trial, and most of those who do, end up getting convicted for the crimes attributed to them.
Many employers run the OIG background check before hiring an employee or entity, and routinely afterward to ensure their employees do not get added to the list once hired. This background check is free and can be completed on the OIG website by searching the employee’s or candidate’s name. Search results include date of birth, address, and reason for exclusion and can be confirmed with a Social Security number (SSN).
In Canada, criminal records are stored in Criminal Records Information Management Services,[10] a centralized database operated by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police under the Canadian Police Information Centre (CPIC) since 1972.[11] The database includes all convictions for which a pardon has not been granted, all charges regardless of disposition, outstanding warrants and charges, all judicial orders and other information that might be of interest to police investigations.[12]
Disclaimer: BeenVerified’s mission is to give people easy and affordable access to public record information, but BeenVerified does not provide private investigator services or consumer reports, and is not a consumer reporting agency per the Fair Credit Reporting Act. You may not use our site or service or the information provided to make decisions about employment, admission, consumer credit, insurance, tenant screening or any other purpose that would require FCRA compliance. For more information governing permitted and prohibited uses, please review our “Do’s & Don’ts” and Terms & Conditions.
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Removal of Offences from the Record Judgements against an individual are not published on a Bulletin 3 certificate once the rehabilitation period has passed (depending on the severity of the conviction either three years for misdemeanours or five years for felony crimes, after the sentence was completed).[43] The records of the convictions will remain on the system but will not show on the request of a record. In the case of minors and children, these are removed from the Bulletin 3 once the individual concerned has reached 18 years and/or three years from the date the crime was committed.[43]
Formally, an arrest only refers to those times when an individual is seized and taken into custody. However, depending on each individual law enforcement agency’s own reporting requirements, their arrest records may contain additional information. In addition to a report of actual arrests, you may find information in an arrest record relating to a person being questioned, detained, investigated, charged with a crime, indicted, or facing trial.
In Broken Records, a report on the problems with background checks, the National Consumer Law Center reported that Samuel M. Jackson was allegedly denied employment based on a felony conviction. However, according to the background check, the felony occurred when Jackson was just four years old. In truth, the report misattributed the crime because his name was similar to the actual felon's. Such inaccuracies, according the report, are widespread with background check services because of an “industry-wide lack of accountability” and incentive to “cut corners” in how they collect and attribute information.   
The FBI’s CJIS Division will authenticate U.S. Department of Justice Order 556-73 fingerprint search results for international requests by placing the FBI seal and signature of a Division official on the results, if requested at the time of submission. Documents prepared in this manner may then be sent to the U.S. Department of State Authentications Office by the requestor to be authenticated, if necessary. Please be sure to indicate the country in which the document is to be used. The FBI procedure became effective January 25, 2010, and applies only to documents finalized after that date. Requests to authenticate previously processed results will not be accepted.
All states have official "statewide repositories" of criminal history information that include information contributed by the various county and municipal courts and law enforcement agencies within the state.[101] State repositories are usually accurate, but all states have provisions for the correction of errors that occur in the reporting and recording of criminal history information. Individuals may normally obtain their own records from the state, but to obtain the records of another person, a private individual will normally need to obtain a release from the subject of the record search.[102]
The information in the criminal record certificate includes prior offences, court citations and convictions. According to the severity of the committed crime and, more importantly, the received sentence, most entries are deleted after 5, 10, 15 or 20 years, respectively. The only sentences exempt from this rule are life imprisonment, preventive detention and commitment in a mental hospital.[48]
While not officially a criminal history repository, the National Driver Register (NDR), operated by the Department of Transportation, maintains information on drivers regarding suspended licenses. The NDR maintains a database of information posted by individual states as mandated by federal law. All drivers who have had their licenses suspended for any reason (including suspensions resulting from several successive minor traffic violations: Massachusetts suspends for three separate speeding tickets over a six-month period) have that information posted by state Registry of Motor Vehicles offices to the NDR.
Requirements for expungement vary by state. For example, Utah’s expungement laws require you to pay all fines, fees, restitutions and interest related to the crime, but there is a long list of offenses that cannot be expunged, such as violent felonies, first degree felonies and sex offenses. The state also has a complicated list of other reasons for denying expungement, most of which involve felony and misdemeanor convictions showing a pattern of criminal activity. 
There are many sites claiming to offer the best web-based background checks. At PeopleFinders, we offer one of the industry's most complete databases, filled with public records for almost every U.S. adult. We also have decades of experience to back it up. It couldn't be easier to start your online background check with us today. Keep reading below to see more about what our background database includes:
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